Review Game Rebel

I don’t like using competition for summative assessment reviews. Kahoot and Jeopardy type games are fun, sometimes. Useful, sometimes. I don’t believe these type of reviews are valuable for many students. Learners who are competitive and already understand the material seem to be the ones who enjoy these games the most. As a student, I enjoyed these timed review games because I knew my stuff and wanted show it. I realized even back then, these type of games must be, at best, of limited value for many  and painful, at worst, for other students.

To score well on these games you must be quick and know the material. Well, if you already know the material, the games are not incredibly useful. If you still haven’t mastered topics reviewed in the game, it is my opinion there isn’t much improvement in understanding gained from a competitive game atmosphere. Have you ever noticed some of your students give up and stop playing? I have. When my own children report their review session for a test was spent playing a competitive game, my heart sinks a little. I know that the game may have been of little help.

We play Kahoot in my classes. It’s fun, and I like using it for a warm-up or a “break in the action”. I offer prizes for the leaderboard. When I do choose to play Kahoot I usually include several fun non-subject related games. They have many of those pre-made on the website. I do this so more of my students feel like they have a chance to shine and “win”. I also love to play Kahoot in my advisory class. It would be fun to make a Kindred Advisory game that is all about my students. Now, that would be fun and useful for building community.

So, what do I use for review? Sometimes just question and answer. I know this has limited value, also. I like to use review stations and scavenger hunts. I like to put representative problems on the white board and have groups solve and present to the rest of the class. Speed Dating  is another option. What do you use for review in your classroom?